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However we may feel about it, face masks are here to stay, for the foreseeable future. Born out of necessity, this essential item has since enjoyed a moment in the spotlight featuring on international runways as an “accessory of note”, and becoming a symbol of our political inclinations and values. 

As Aotearoa continues to battle Delta, face masks are still strongly encouraged, though not mandatory everywhere (find the official advice here). Sporting one demonstrates community spirit and respect for your neighbours and fellow kiwis; although there are of course those with a disability or health condition who are unable to wear a covering. For the rest of us, it’s about keeping ourselves and others safe when we’re out in public spaces.

Overseas, particularly in Asia, masks have been a part of the cultural landscape for some time, and we would love to see this same normalisation here - let’s make keeping a mask in our handbag as habitual as having lip balm on hand, or that also essential back-up hair-tie.

And while the blue surgical mask does the job, inject a bit of fun into your daily errands with a playful and practical reusable option. Many of our local fashion brands have been offering their own versions in seasonal colourways or prints - and better yet, these masks are often made using fabric off-cuts helping to reduce waste.

Getting milk and flowers from your local dairy

Ash Williams wears a Kate Sylvester mask, $39, jacket, $569, and shorts, $349.

Going for a little walk

Lola wears a Juliette Hogan mask, $55, and dress, $699.

Leaving the house

Ash wears a Rachel Mills mask, $25, and jumpsuit, $289, with a Baobei glass necklace, from $195.

Catching up on the news

Josiah wears a Loclaire mask, $19 (available to order via Instagram DM).

Hanging out in the park 

Sam wears a Zambesi mask, $50, and shorts, $330, with their own Jil Sander T-shirt.

Getting a coffee

Ash Williams wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, and her own pants and Miaou corset.

Keeping others safe

K from Auckland city hole-in-the-wall Receptionist Coffee wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, with his own shirt and tie.

Photography and styling by Rob Tennent

This shoot was conducted within all current level 3 guidelines.

No items found.

However we may feel about it, face masks are here to stay, for the foreseeable future. Born out of necessity, this essential item has since enjoyed a moment in the spotlight featuring on international runways as an “accessory of note”, and becoming a symbol of our political inclinations and values. 

As Aotearoa continues to battle Delta, face masks are still strongly encouraged, though not mandatory everywhere (find the official advice here). Sporting one demonstrates community spirit and respect for your neighbours and fellow kiwis; although there are of course those with a disability or health condition who are unable to wear a covering. For the rest of us, it’s about keeping ourselves and others safe when we’re out in public spaces.

Overseas, particularly in Asia, masks have been a part of the cultural landscape for some time, and we would love to see this same normalisation here - let’s make keeping a mask in our handbag as habitual as having lip balm on hand, or that also essential back-up hair-tie.

And while the blue surgical mask does the job, inject a bit of fun into your daily errands with a playful and practical reusable option. Many of our local fashion brands have been offering their own versions in seasonal colourways or prints - and better yet, these masks are often made using fabric off-cuts helping to reduce waste.

Getting milk and flowers from your local dairy

Ash Williams wears a Kate Sylvester mask, $39, jacket, $569, and shorts, $349.

Going for a little walk

Lola wears a Juliette Hogan mask, $55, and dress, $699.

Leaving the house

Ash wears a Rachel Mills mask, $25, and jumpsuit, $289, with a Baobei glass necklace, from $195.

Catching up on the news

Josiah wears a Loclaire mask, $19 (available to order via Instagram DM).

Hanging out in the park 

Sam wears a Zambesi mask, $50, and shorts, $330, with their own Jil Sander T-shirt.

Getting a coffee

Ash Williams wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, and her own pants and Miaou corset.

Keeping others safe

K from Auckland city hole-in-the-wall Receptionist Coffee wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, with his own shirt and tie.

Photography and styling by Rob Tennent

This shoot was conducted within all current level 3 guidelines.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

However we may feel about it, face masks are here to stay, for the foreseeable future. Born out of necessity, this essential item has since enjoyed a moment in the spotlight featuring on international runways as an “accessory of note”, and becoming a symbol of our political inclinations and values. 

As Aotearoa continues to battle Delta, face masks are still strongly encouraged, though not mandatory everywhere (find the official advice here). Sporting one demonstrates community spirit and respect for your neighbours and fellow kiwis; although there are of course those with a disability or health condition who are unable to wear a covering. For the rest of us, it’s about keeping ourselves and others safe when we’re out in public spaces.

Overseas, particularly in Asia, masks have been a part of the cultural landscape for some time, and we would love to see this same normalisation here - let’s make keeping a mask in our handbag as habitual as having lip balm on hand, or that also essential back-up hair-tie.

And while the blue surgical mask does the job, inject a bit of fun into your daily errands with a playful and practical reusable option. Many of our local fashion brands have been offering their own versions in seasonal colourways or prints - and better yet, these masks are often made using fabric off-cuts helping to reduce waste.

Getting milk and flowers from your local dairy

Ash Williams wears a Kate Sylvester mask, $39, jacket, $569, and shorts, $349.

Going for a little walk

Lola wears a Juliette Hogan mask, $55, and dress, $699.

Leaving the house

Ash wears a Rachel Mills mask, $25, and jumpsuit, $289, with a Baobei glass necklace, from $195.

Catching up on the news

Josiah wears a Loclaire mask, $19 (available to order via Instagram DM).

Hanging out in the park 

Sam wears a Zambesi mask, $50, and shorts, $330, with their own Jil Sander T-shirt.

Getting a coffee

Ash Williams wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, and her own pants and Miaou corset.

Keeping others safe

K from Auckland city hole-in-the-wall Receptionist Coffee wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, with his own shirt and tie.

Photography and styling by Rob Tennent

This shoot was conducted within all current level 3 guidelines.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

However we may feel about it, face masks are here to stay, for the foreseeable future. Born out of necessity, this essential item has since enjoyed a moment in the spotlight featuring on international runways as an “accessory of note”, and becoming a symbol of our political inclinations and values. 

As Aotearoa continues to battle Delta, face masks are still strongly encouraged, though not mandatory everywhere (find the official advice here). Sporting one demonstrates community spirit and respect for your neighbours and fellow kiwis; although there are of course those with a disability or health condition who are unable to wear a covering. For the rest of us, it’s about keeping ourselves and others safe when we’re out in public spaces.

Overseas, particularly in Asia, masks have been a part of the cultural landscape for some time, and we would love to see this same normalisation here - let’s make keeping a mask in our handbag as habitual as having lip balm on hand, or that also essential back-up hair-tie.

And while the blue surgical mask does the job, inject a bit of fun into your daily errands with a playful and practical reusable option. Many of our local fashion brands have been offering their own versions in seasonal colourways or prints - and better yet, these masks are often made using fabric off-cuts helping to reduce waste.

Getting milk and flowers from your local dairy

Ash Williams wears a Kate Sylvester mask, $39, jacket, $569, and shorts, $349.

Going for a little walk

Lola wears a Juliette Hogan mask, $55, and dress, $699.

Leaving the house

Ash wears a Rachel Mills mask, $25, and jumpsuit, $289, with a Baobei glass necklace, from $195.

Catching up on the news

Josiah wears a Loclaire mask, $19 (available to order via Instagram DM).

Hanging out in the park 

Sam wears a Zambesi mask, $50, and shorts, $330, with their own Jil Sander T-shirt.

Getting a coffee

Ash Williams wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, and her own pants and Miaou corset.

Keeping others safe

K from Auckland city hole-in-the-wall Receptionist Coffee wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, with his own shirt and tie.

Photography and styling by Rob Tennent

This shoot was conducted within all current level 3 guidelines.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

However we may feel about it, face masks are here to stay, for the foreseeable future. Born out of necessity, this essential item has since enjoyed a moment in the spotlight featuring on international runways as an “accessory of note”, and becoming a symbol of our political inclinations and values. 

As Aotearoa continues to battle Delta, face masks are still strongly encouraged, though not mandatory everywhere (find the official advice here). Sporting one demonstrates community spirit and respect for your neighbours and fellow kiwis; although there are of course those with a disability or health condition who are unable to wear a covering. For the rest of us, it’s about keeping ourselves and others safe when we’re out in public spaces.

Overseas, particularly in Asia, masks have been a part of the cultural landscape for some time, and we would love to see this same normalisation here - let’s make keeping a mask in our handbag as habitual as having lip balm on hand, or that also essential back-up hair-tie.

And while the blue surgical mask does the job, inject a bit of fun into your daily errands with a playful and practical reusable option. Many of our local fashion brands have been offering their own versions in seasonal colourways or prints - and better yet, these masks are often made using fabric off-cuts helping to reduce waste.

Getting milk and flowers from your local dairy

Ash Williams wears a Kate Sylvester mask, $39, jacket, $569, and shorts, $349.

Going for a little walk

Lola wears a Juliette Hogan mask, $55, and dress, $699.

Leaving the house

Ash wears a Rachel Mills mask, $25, and jumpsuit, $289, with a Baobei glass necklace, from $195.

Catching up on the news

Josiah wears a Loclaire mask, $19 (available to order via Instagram DM).

Hanging out in the park 

Sam wears a Zambesi mask, $50, and shorts, $330, with their own Jil Sander T-shirt.

Getting a coffee

Ash Williams wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, and her own pants and Miaou corset.

Keeping others safe

K from Auckland city hole-in-the-wall Receptionist Coffee wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, with his own shirt and tie.

Photography and styling by Rob Tennent

This shoot was conducted within all current level 3 guidelines.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

However we may feel about it, face masks are here to stay, for the foreseeable future. Born out of necessity, this essential item has since enjoyed a moment in the spotlight featuring on international runways as an “accessory of note”, and becoming a symbol of our political inclinations and values. 

As Aotearoa continues to battle Delta, face masks are still strongly encouraged, though not mandatory everywhere (find the official advice here). Sporting one demonstrates community spirit and respect for your neighbours and fellow kiwis; although there are of course those with a disability or health condition who are unable to wear a covering. For the rest of us, it’s about keeping ourselves and others safe when we’re out in public spaces.

Overseas, particularly in Asia, masks have been a part of the cultural landscape for some time, and we would love to see this same normalisation here - let’s make keeping a mask in our handbag as habitual as having lip balm on hand, or that also essential back-up hair-tie.

And while the blue surgical mask does the job, inject a bit of fun into your daily errands with a playful and practical reusable option. Many of our local fashion brands have been offering their own versions in seasonal colourways or prints - and better yet, these masks are often made using fabric off-cuts helping to reduce waste.

Getting milk and flowers from your local dairy

Ash Williams wears a Kate Sylvester mask, $39, jacket, $569, and shorts, $349.

Going for a little walk

Lola wears a Juliette Hogan mask, $55, and dress, $699.

Leaving the house

Ash wears a Rachel Mills mask, $25, and jumpsuit, $289, with a Baobei glass necklace, from $195.

Catching up on the news

Josiah wears a Loclaire mask, $19 (available to order via Instagram DM).

Hanging out in the park 

Sam wears a Zambesi mask, $50, and shorts, $330, with their own Jil Sander T-shirt.

Getting a coffee

Ash Williams wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, and her own pants and Miaou corset.

Keeping others safe

K from Auckland city hole-in-the-wall Receptionist Coffee wears a Standard Issue mask, $49, with his own shirt and tie.

Photography and styling by Rob Tennent

This shoot was conducted within all current level 3 guidelines.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.