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Benee is re-selling her clothes for charity

If you’re using your time in lockdown to clear out your wardrobe, you’re not alone. Kiwi musician Benee, known for her playful sense of style, has also been rifling through her closet, offering some pre-loved looks up for sale through the app Depop to raise money for local charity Eat Up New Zealand.

Pieces from the sale include outfits from the Supalonely singer’s first performances and videos, including bucket hats, vintage shirts, a full sequin tracksuit and the basketball singlet worn by Benee at the All Star Celeb Slam last year. And sneakers, lots of sneakers. Every dollar raised will be matched by Depop.

Many of the pieces quickly sold out after she shared the news of the sale on Instagram, but there are a few items still available. 

A representative for the singer said that there aren’t plans to add more pieces, but there is a possibility of doing another drop later in the year. 

“Getting the chance to team up with Depop is really cool because I've always been a big fan of the Depop community and the importance they place on sustainability and recycling clothes,” Benee said in a statement.

“Good food and clean water should be the right of every child in this world. Education is the key to addressing social inequality and children can’t learn on an empty stomach which is why I’m supporting Eat Up New Zealand - a charity who help to feed disadvantaged kiwi school kids who otherwise go hungry, so they can grow, learn and succeed.”

In an Instagram Q&A with the platform, Benee said that she personally buys many of her own vintage clothes through the platform.

“Too many clothes go into the landfill. We need to reuse, re-home, and repurpose. I buy a lot of my clothes second hand and on Depop.”

Depop is a hugely successful British-based fashion resale app, launched in 2011. It has since grown with 30m+ global users, with a particular focus on the much sought after Gen Z audience - 90 percent of Depop’s 30 million active users across 150 countries are under the age of 26.

In June it was bought by Etsy for approximately $1.625 billion USD; a much-talked about acquisition that reflects the fashion industry’s lucrative and growing vintage and resale market.

Pre lockdown Benee had performed a series of orchestral shows with the NZ Symphony Orchestra (while wearing incredible custom pieces by NYC-based designer Qingzi Gao and Wellington-based Olli), with two additional shows with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra planned for early September. 

Earlier this month she also revealed a clothing collaboration with Spanish clothing brand Bershka.

No items found.

If you’re using your time in lockdown to clear out your wardrobe, you’re not alone. Kiwi musician Benee, known for her playful sense of style, has also been rifling through her closet, offering some pre-loved looks up for sale through the app Depop to raise money for local charity Eat Up New Zealand.

Pieces from the sale include outfits from the Supalonely singer’s first performances and videos, including bucket hats, vintage shirts, a full sequin tracksuit and the basketball singlet worn by Benee at the All Star Celeb Slam last year. And sneakers, lots of sneakers. Every dollar raised will be matched by Depop.

Many of the pieces quickly sold out after she shared the news of the sale on Instagram, but there are a few items still available. 

A representative for the singer said that there aren’t plans to add more pieces, but there is a possibility of doing another drop later in the year. 

“Getting the chance to team up with Depop is really cool because I've always been a big fan of the Depop community and the importance they place on sustainability and recycling clothes,” Benee said in a statement.

“Good food and clean water should be the right of every child in this world. Education is the key to addressing social inequality and children can’t learn on an empty stomach which is why I’m supporting Eat Up New Zealand - a charity who help to feed disadvantaged kiwi school kids who otherwise go hungry, so they can grow, learn and succeed.”

In an Instagram Q&A with the platform, Benee said that she personally buys many of her own vintage clothes through the platform.

“Too many clothes go into the landfill. We need to reuse, re-home, and repurpose. I buy a lot of my clothes second hand and on Depop.”

Depop is a hugely successful British-based fashion resale app, launched in 2011. It has since grown with 30m+ global users, with a particular focus on the much sought after Gen Z audience - 90 percent of Depop’s 30 million active users across 150 countries are under the age of 26.

In June it was bought by Etsy for approximately $1.625 billion USD; a much-talked about acquisition that reflects the fashion industry’s lucrative and growing vintage and resale market.

Pre lockdown Benee had performed a series of orchestral shows with the NZ Symphony Orchestra (while wearing incredible custom pieces by NYC-based designer Qingzi Gao and Wellington-based Olli), with two additional shows with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra planned for early September. 

Earlier this month she also revealed a clothing collaboration with Spanish clothing brand Bershka.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

Benee is re-selling her clothes for charity

If you’re using your time in lockdown to clear out your wardrobe, you’re not alone. Kiwi musician Benee, known for her playful sense of style, has also been rifling through her closet, offering some pre-loved looks up for sale through the app Depop to raise money for local charity Eat Up New Zealand.

Pieces from the sale include outfits from the Supalonely singer’s first performances and videos, including bucket hats, vintage shirts, a full sequin tracksuit and the basketball singlet worn by Benee at the All Star Celeb Slam last year. And sneakers, lots of sneakers. Every dollar raised will be matched by Depop.

Many of the pieces quickly sold out after she shared the news of the sale on Instagram, but there are a few items still available. 

A representative for the singer said that there aren’t plans to add more pieces, but there is a possibility of doing another drop later in the year. 

“Getting the chance to team up with Depop is really cool because I've always been a big fan of the Depop community and the importance they place on sustainability and recycling clothes,” Benee said in a statement.

“Good food and clean water should be the right of every child in this world. Education is the key to addressing social inequality and children can’t learn on an empty stomach which is why I’m supporting Eat Up New Zealand - a charity who help to feed disadvantaged kiwi school kids who otherwise go hungry, so they can grow, learn and succeed.”

In an Instagram Q&A with the platform, Benee said that she personally buys many of her own vintage clothes through the platform.

“Too many clothes go into the landfill. We need to reuse, re-home, and repurpose. I buy a lot of my clothes second hand and on Depop.”

Depop is a hugely successful British-based fashion resale app, launched in 2011. It has since grown with 30m+ global users, with a particular focus on the much sought after Gen Z audience - 90 percent of Depop’s 30 million active users across 150 countries are under the age of 26.

In June it was bought by Etsy for approximately $1.625 billion USD; a much-talked about acquisition that reflects the fashion industry’s lucrative and growing vintage and resale market.

Pre lockdown Benee had performed a series of orchestral shows with the NZ Symphony Orchestra (while wearing incredible custom pieces by NYC-based designer Qingzi Gao and Wellington-based Olli), with two additional shows with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra planned for early September. 

Earlier this month she also revealed a clothing collaboration with Spanish clothing brand Bershka.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

Benee is re-selling her clothes for charity

If you’re using your time in lockdown to clear out your wardrobe, you’re not alone. Kiwi musician Benee, known for her playful sense of style, has also been rifling through her closet, offering some pre-loved looks up for sale through the app Depop to raise money for local charity Eat Up New Zealand.

Pieces from the sale include outfits from the Supalonely singer’s first performances and videos, including bucket hats, vintage shirts, a full sequin tracksuit and the basketball singlet worn by Benee at the All Star Celeb Slam last year. And sneakers, lots of sneakers. Every dollar raised will be matched by Depop.

Many of the pieces quickly sold out after she shared the news of the sale on Instagram, but there are a few items still available. 

A representative for the singer said that there aren’t plans to add more pieces, but there is a possibility of doing another drop later in the year. 

“Getting the chance to team up with Depop is really cool because I've always been a big fan of the Depop community and the importance they place on sustainability and recycling clothes,” Benee said in a statement.

“Good food and clean water should be the right of every child in this world. Education is the key to addressing social inequality and children can’t learn on an empty stomach which is why I’m supporting Eat Up New Zealand - a charity who help to feed disadvantaged kiwi school kids who otherwise go hungry, so they can grow, learn and succeed.”

In an Instagram Q&A with the platform, Benee said that she personally buys many of her own vintage clothes through the platform.

“Too many clothes go into the landfill. We need to reuse, re-home, and repurpose. I buy a lot of my clothes second hand and on Depop.”

Depop is a hugely successful British-based fashion resale app, launched in 2011. It has since grown with 30m+ global users, with a particular focus on the much sought after Gen Z audience - 90 percent of Depop’s 30 million active users across 150 countries are under the age of 26.

In June it was bought by Etsy for approximately $1.625 billion USD; a much-talked about acquisition that reflects the fashion industry’s lucrative and growing vintage and resale market.

Pre lockdown Benee had performed a series of orchestral shows with the NZ Symphony Orchestra (while wearing incredible custom pieces by NYC-based designer Qingzi Gao and Wellington-based Olli), with two additional shows with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra planned for early September. 

Earlier this month she also revealed a clothing collaboration with Spanish clothing brand Bershka.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

If you’re using your time in lockdown to clear out your wardrobe, you’re not alone. Kiwi musician Benee, known for her playful sense of style, has also been rifling through her closet, offering some pre-loved looks up for sale through the app Depop to raise money for local charity Eat Up New Zealand.

Pieces from the sale include outfits from the Supalonely singer’s first performances and videos, including bucket hats, vintage shirts, a full sequin tracksuit and the basketball singlet worn by Benee at the All Star Celeb Slam last year. And sneakers, lots of sneakers. Every dollar raised will be matched by Depop.

Many of the pieces quickly sold out after she shared the news of the sale on Instagram, but there are a few items still available. 

A representative for the singer said that there aren’t plans to add more pieces, but there is a possibility of doing another drop later in the year. 

“Getting the chance to team up with Depop is really cool because I've always been a big fan of the Depop community and the importance they place on sustainability and recycling clothes,” Benee said in a statement.

“Good food and clean water should be the right of every child in this world. Education is the key to addressing social inequality and children can’t learn on an empty stomach which is why I’m supporting Eat Up New Zealand - a charity who help to feed disadvantaged kiwi school kids who otherwise go hungry, so they can grow, learn and succeed.”

In an Instagram Q&A with the platform, Benee said that she personally buys many of her own vintage clothes through the platform.

“Too many clothes go into the landfill. We need to reuse, re-home, and repurpose. I buy a lot of my clothes second hand and on Depop.”

Depop is a hugely successful British-based fashion resale app, launched in 2011. It has since grown with 30m+ global users, with a particular focus on the much sought after Gen Z audience - 90 percent of Depop’s 30 million active users across 150 countries are under the age of 26.

In June it was bought by Etsy for approximately $1.625 billion USD; a much-talked about acquisition that reflects the fashion industry’s lucrative and growing vintage and resale market.

Pre lockdown Benee had performed a series of orchestral shows with the NZ Symphony Orchestra (while wearing incredible custom pieces by NYC-based designer Qingzi Gao and Wellington-based Olli), with two additional shows with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra planned for early September. 

Earlier this month she also revealed a clothing collaboration with Spanish clothing brand Bershka.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.

Benee is re-selling her clothes for charity

If you’re using your time in lockdown to clear out your wardrobe, you’re not alone. Kiwi musician Benee, known for her playful sense of style, has also been rifling through her closet, offering some pre-loved looks up for sale through the app Depop to raise money for local charity Eat Up New Zealand.

Pieces from the sale include outfits from the Supalonely singer’s first performances and videos, including bucket hats, vintage shirts, a full sequin tracksuit and the basketball singlet worn by Benee at the All Star Celeb Slam last year. And sneakers, lots of sneakers. Every dollar raised will be matched by Depop.

Many of the pieces quickly sold out after she shared the news of the sale on Instagram, but there are a few items still available. 

A representative for the singer said that there aren’t plans to add more pieces, but there is a possibility of doing another drop later in the year. 

“Getting the chance to team up with Depop is really cool because I've always been a big fan of the Depop community and the importance they place on sustainability and recycling clothes,” Benee said in a statement.

“Good food and clean water should be the right of every child in this world. Education is the key to addressing social inequality and children can’t learn on an empty stomach which is why I’m supporting Eat Up New Zealand - a charity who help to feed disadvantaged kiwi school kids who otherwise go hungry, so they can grow, learn and succeed.”

In an Instagram Q&A with the platform, Benee said that she personally buys many of her own vintage clothes through the platform.

“Too many clothes go into the landfill. We need to reuse, re-home, and repurpose. I buy a lot of my clothes second hand and on Depop.”

Depop is a hugely successful British-based fashion resale app, launched in 2011. It has since grown with 30m+ global users, with a particular focus on the much sought after Gen Z audience - 90 percent of Depop’s 30 million active users across 150 countries are under the age of 26.

In June it was bought by Etsy for approximately $1.625 billion USD; a much-talked about acquisition that reflects the fashion industry’s lucrative and growing vintage and resale market.

Pre lockdown Benee had performed a series of orchestral shows with the NZ Symphony Orchestra (while wearing incredible custom pieces by NYC-based designer Qingzi Gao and Wellington-based Olli), with two additional shows with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra planned for early September. 

Earlier this month she also revealed a clothing collaboration with Spanish clothing brand Bershka.

Creativity, evocative visual storytelling and good journalism come at a price. Support our work and join the Ensemble membership program
No items found.